The C.P.C.P.I Service Committee of the Tri-County Intergroup of Alcoholics Anonymous

For Professionals

Resources For The Professional Community

Learn how the C.P.C.P.I Service Committee of the Tri-County Intergroup of Alcoholics Anonymous shares A.A.’s alcoholism recovery program in Raleigh, Cary, Morrisville, Wake Forest and surrounding areas of Wake, Franklin, and Warren Counties with professionals and the general public.

Tri-County Intergroup Wants To Work With You

About A.A.

For Professionals…

A.A.’s primary purpose, as stated in our Preamble, is: “to stay sober and help other alcoholics to achieve sobriety.”

Alcoholics Anonymous is a nonprofit, self-supporting, entirely independent fellowship — “not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization or institution.” Yet A.A. is in a position to serve as a resource to you through its policy of “cooperation but not affiliation” with the professional community.

We can serve as a source of personal experience with alcoholism as an ongoing support system for recovering alcoholics.

Reprinted from (If You are A Professional…, page 3), with permission of A.A. World Services, Inc.

What is A.A.?

Alcoholics Anonymous® is a fellowship of people who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism.

  • The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues or fees for A.A. membership; we are self-supporting through our own contributions.
  • A.A. is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization or institution; does not wish to engage in any controversy; neither endorses nor opposes any causes.
  • Our primary purpose is to stay sober and help other alcoholics to achieve sobriety.

Copyright © by AA Grapevine, Inc.; reprinted with permission.

Interested in an A.A. Presentation?

Wake, Warren, and Franklin A.A. happily offers free presentations or talks about A.A. for your public or professional group or organization. We are freely available to convey what A.A. is, where A.A. can be found, and what A.A. can do to help those with a desire to stop drinking.

CPC Committee members are available to speak in person or via an online video platform anywhere the A.A. message can be useful. Our members have experience talking at schools, local businesses, parole/probation offices, DUI classes, health fairs, art festivals, churches, civic groups, community centers, medical centers, and treatment facilities, among others.

Interested In A.A. Information For Your Office?

A.A. Meetings

The purpose of all A.A. group meetings, as the Preamble states, is for A.A. members to “share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help oth-ers to recover from alcoholism.” Toward this end, A.A. groups have both open and closed meetings.

Closed meetings are for A.A. members only, or for those who have a drinking problem and “have a desire to stop drinking.”

Open meetings are available to anyone interested in Alcoholics Anonymous’ program of recovery from alcoholism. Non-alcoholics may attend open meetings as observers.

At both types of meetings, the A.A. chairperson may request that participants confine their discussion to matters pertaining to recovery from alcoholism.

Whether open or closed, A.A. group meetings are conducted by A.A. members who determine the format of their meetings.

Reprinted from (The A.A. Group, page 13), with permission of A.A. World Services, Inc.

A.A. Resources for the Professional

Resources from A.A. in the Tri-County Area

Resources for Family & Friends of the Alcoholic

Resources from A.A. World Service Office

A.A.’s primary purpose, as stated in our Preamble, is: “to stay sober and help other alcoholics to achieve sobriety.”

Alcoholics Anonymous is a nonprofit, self-supporting, entirely independent fellowship — “not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization or institution.” Yet A.A. is in a position to serve as a resource to you through its policy of “cooperation but not affiliation” with the professional community.

We can serve as a source of personal experience with alcoholism as a peer-to-peer support system for recovering alcoholics.

What A.A. Does NOT Do

A.A. does not: Furnish initial motivation for alcoholics to recover; solicit members; engage in or sponsor research; keep attendance records or case histories; join “councils” or social agencies (although A.A. members, groups and service offices frequently cooperate with them); follow up or try to control its members; make medical or psychological diagnoses or prognoses; provide detox, rehabilitation or nursing services, hospitalization, drugs, or any medical or psychiatric treatment; offer religious services or host/sponsor retreats; engage in education about alcohol; provide housing, food, clothing, jobs, money or any other welfare or social services; provide domestic or vocational counseling; accept any money for its services or any contributions from non-A.A. sources; provide letters of reference to parole boards, lawyers, court officials, social agencies, employers, etc.

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